Major Themes In A Raisin In The Sun By Lorraine Hansberry

Do you know how to create a compelling introduction and an understandable conclusion on A Raisin in the Sun? Don’t worry if you get stuck because our competent writers can handle the outline for you. Beneatha’s defiance toward Walter is symbolic of her defiance toward all barriers of stereotype. She never yields to Walter and, in some cases, even goads him into a confrontation. Ruth’s advice to Beneatha is that she should just “be nice” sometimes and not argue over every one of Walter’s insensitive remarks. She makes it clear, early on, that she has no use for George Murchison because of his shallow beliefs.

People have dreams that they pursue, but sometimes the pursuit of their goals can take a dangerous precedence over what is truly important to them. Depending on the goals of these dreams, people will change themselves and their lives in order to live up to the standards of that dream. The changes one does to make their dream come true can affect their reality, which includes family, friends, and work. Everything in their current life is put in jeopardy, just to attain a fictional life that they have dreamt. How many people can say they have put in the effort and time it takes to grow a garden?

Beneatha and her brother Walter didn’t agree on what a better life actually was. Beneatha thinks Walter’s idea is a waste of money, and she thinks Walter doesn’t have the drive or skills to be successful and is happy mama said no to the liquor store. However, if one focuses on how African Americans would encounter the work’s theme of Black achievement, the terms of the debate change. In the Younger household, success is defined in patriarchal terms, devaluing half the community. Scholars and readers rarely notice this, however, because most insist upon seeing Mama Lena as the embodiment of resistance to racism. Besides slapping Beneatha, she “starts to beat senselessly in the face” for losing the insurance money.

Idea Of The “american Dream” In A Raisin In The Sun By Lorraine Hansberry

In Lorraine Hansberry’s A Raisin In the Sun, an African-American family living in a tiny, run-down apartment on the south side of Chicago, encounters barriers due to poverty and structural racism as they try to turn their dreams into reality. I think that he would think about life for blacks, though, and probably wonder how many people have to live with cockroaches around in families where mom is the head of the household because dad left or he died. He would remember the television news coverage of how sheriff Jim Clark behaved in Selma on March 7, 1965. That was the day when sheriff Clark, his vicious dogs, and other officers on horseback just went into a crowd of black demonstrators . They beat women, boys, girls, older men, with their nightsticks and the TV showed the whole ugly situation. This was the Selma to Montgomery march let by Rev. Martin Luther King.

  • Some works are strictly fictional, while some have elements of reality.
  • He has sacrificed many things to help Ruth go to school and he doesn’t understand why she nor George goes to school if it isnt to learn about making money or becoming a man.
  • The activities told here are new ideas and the author is introducing them to the readers.
  • Although the abortion theme is merely touched on in this play, the way is opened for other writers to treat it more thoroughly in future plays.
  • Waiting for the curtain to rise on opening night, Hansberry and producer Rose did not expect the play to be a success, for it had already received mixed reviews from a preview audience the night before.

Their pursuit will lead them to many sacrifices and risks that affect themselves and their family. Individuals with strong determination to pursue their dreams such as Walter and Beneatha depicts how dreams can interfere with reality, which causes them to detach from their lives and sacrifice everything. In A Raisin in the Sun, the power of money regarding social stature and dignity is also presented. This is demonstrated when Beneatha talks to Ruth about one of her suitors, George Murchison. George is an anomaly regarding the white whale meaning black men in this period, for he is rich and lives in the luxury which is normally attained by white people. Beneatha tells Ruth that George is offensively snobbish and rude due to his higher class.

Speculate The Times!

The hope to escape poverty is only given concrete assistance by the death of the father, but when most of this money is stolen the family comes together in a show of unity. It is as though the play argues finally that just by having the dream one will become a success as hope has triumphed over adversity. As the stage directions for Act One, Scene One reveal, the Younger family live in cramped conditions and as they talk it becomes all the more evident that their lives are dominated by the combined traps of poverty and racism. As Walter points, it has always been about money and this telling remark represents how this play tries to demonstrate that poverty both justifies and creates inequalities.

a raisin in the sun theme essay

Lena represents the old woman, while Beneatha represents the new. A Raisin in the Sun – WomenA Raisin in the Sun – Women A Raisin in the Sun by Lorraine Hansberry presents many themes that are found in everyday life. This is shown through the differences in opinion about religion, marriage, and their d…

Mainly I guess because we’ve been through hell and high water together. We know each other’s good and bad sides, stuff nobody else knows.” In reaction to this, Taylor becomes unable to speak for she is too emotional. After years of running away from family and avoiding becoming a mother, Taylor gives in. She realizes that she has found her truest and happiest self as a mother to Turtle in a home with Lou Ann. In addition to this, Taylor finally understands that she has gained support for this identity.